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Jul 05 2012

Perpetuating the Hobby or Starting to GM

Last night I was chatting with a friend who has been running a Leverage game for us on Friday’s when we get the chance. This is her first go around at GMing and I’d have to say she’s doing a mighty fine job of it so far. The people in the game also find her to be doing a good job but she’s having some confidence issues and asked me if I was ever nervous about games I’m about to run. I told her no, not anymore, but I also understand where she’s coming from. I used to get nervous. I used to be worried. I’m not anymore because I have a firm foundation for my gaming and GM philosophy fall back on. I told her all of this and then gave her some of the base idea’s I work with.

1. The most important thing a GM does is make sure everyone is having a good time. This statement is a little deeper than it seems. The first part concerns everyone. That means the GM needs to make sure they’re having fun too. The game can’t be geared to entertain the players if what’s entertaining the players isn’t fun for the GM. That way leads to sour gaming all around or no gaming because a GM who isn’t having fun is probably not going to run the game. This leads to the second part of the statement which is figuring out what is fun for your players. This can be done in any number of ways from having conversations, trial and error, or even questioners. All I’m saying is what is fun for one person might not be fun for another and the GM needs to find out where everyone’s fun zone is.

2. The GM needs to figure out what the game their playing does and how it does it. Once again this is a little deeper than just the statement. The Leverage RPG is trying to simulate the situations and plot developments seen in the television show which is about thieves pulling off a heist. In a session of Leverage no one dies. That means the game is about how the job goes down. This happens through the complications the GM can put on the job as ones are rolled by the players. The complications in the story are more like twists in Mouse Guard, they make things interesting. Once you understand your agenda as the GM and how you can push that agenda it becomes a lot easier to run the game.

3. The GM needs to figure out how to make themselves comfortable when running the game. This takes a bit of trial and error and self analysis. It helps to ask yourself some questions like what kind of notes do you need? How many people can you handle at your table? Do you need a quick reference rules sheet. Do you prefer rolling in the open or behind a screen? Mini or not to mini? Pens or Pencils? Index Cards or Sticky notes? Outlines or Paragraphs or Power point presentations or whatever? There’s a ton of tools out there you can use to assist you. It’s up to you to figure out what works best and that means trying things out. I use different tools for different games but I almost always like to have an outline of things that could happen, a list of NPC’s along with some tags for their personalities and quirks, a name list when I need to make up an NPC on the spot, and the motivations for the scenario. Everything else after that is game dependent for me. 4e I want some miniatures. In other games I might just need a piece of paper to scrawl the map on as they explore. Sometimes I might not need anything but some note cards to write down NPC names on as the PC’s meet them so they don’t forget who they’ve met. I suggest you just think about what you might need for a given game after you’ve got your scenario hashed out and then go with it. I will also recommend Never Unprepared: The Complete Guide to Session Prep. It’s a solid book for doing such work.

To conclude I’d like to say to the GM’s out there. Start encouraging people in your groups to do a little GMing of their own and if they ask for advice think about what works for you and why. Then let them know this is what you do and why you do it. It might not be the same for them but it might give them some idea’s because your strengths as a GM might be their weaknesses and their strengths might be your weaknesses. Beyond that I can recommend some other books to help GM’s with the craft:

Robin’s Law’s of Good Game Mastering by Robin Laws
Play Dirty by John Wick
Play Unsafe by Graham Walmsley
Never Unprepared: The Complete Guide to Session Prep by Phil Vecchione
Masks: 1000 Memorable NPC’s for any Game by Engine Publishing
Eureka: 501 Adventure Plots to Inspire Game Masters by Engine Publishing

I’m sure there are other books out there and I’d love to hear about them. If you know of any I’d love to build a list of GM help books for people to reference.

Game On,

Chris “The Light” Sniezak

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