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May 03 2012

From the Other Side – A Players Perspective

I GM most of the games I play in these days but a few years back I was playing in a weekly game and running a weekly game. It was pure bliss. All the while I was learning all kinds of things since I got to see how things worked from both sides of the screen. I dealt with the frustrations, triumphs, trends of my dice (both good and bad), the twists and turns of the story, and all the up and downs as GM and player. Today I wanna talk a little bit about the things I learned from the player side such as player expectations, what I can and can’t get away with as a GM, and what gets players excited. I think the most important thing I learned was players have just as much responsibility for creating a fun and exciting gaming environment as the GM. That means we, as players, are not to wait for the GM to entertain us. Let me say it one more time because it’s important.

We are not to wait for the GM to entertain us.

Ok, now that I’ve said it twice I suppose I should explain what I mean if you’re not sure. If you think you know just keep reading to see if we agree. If we don’t leave a comment so I can see what you think. I’m always trying to learn.

I believe it’s the players job to help engage the GM and the other players at the table and here are some of the ideas players can use to do so:

  • Bring energy to the table. If you bring energy to the table as a player and believably to your character then any GM worth their salt will feed on that energy. Now energy doesn’t just mean be over bearing and bouncy. It mean come with an interest in what’s going for all the characters and be supportive to the story.
  • Give the other players at the table insight into what a characters belief structure is. So you’re bent on vengance because your father murdered your mother while you stood by and watched helplessly. You probably have some issues. How would a character act if this was their defining moment? What other defining moments does this character have? How would those affect their development? Once you answer some of these questions the only thing you need to be aware of is this game is about cooperative storytelling. That means you need to find a way to open up this information to the rest of the group. It doesn’t have to be all at once. It doesn’t even have to be nice, but try and remember the basic structure of the game your playing and work your story into it. It helps to find another character who is most likely to help you tell your story which leads to the next point.
  • Help each other bring out the backrounds, quirks, and stories of the characters. If you find ways to relate to each others characters stories or create sympathetic strands between the characters lives the information goes from being something in the backround of the game to a tool binding the characters together. This helps drive group decisions and creates group cohesion. This also gives the GM’s fodder with which to work. Now the GM has more tools to create compelling situations specific to things the characters care about.
  • Make a declaration and roll with it. Just because you haven’t said it yet or don’t have it written on your character sheet doesn’t mean it can’t be true. There are plenty of times in storytelling when we find out something about a character that we didn’t realize before but in retrospect it makes perfect sense. Trust me when I say writers don’t always have these connections and background bits in some master outline they write from and never stray off of. Sometimes they just write in things that make sense for the character and help drive the story forward. You can do that too. Things aren’t truths about the game world your playing in until they’re stated and even then they can be changed through perceptions and preconceived notions.
  • Don’t dominate the table. If you have a big mouth don’t take the spotlight all the time and when you do take the spotlight try to share it with others or shine it on someone else. I know a guy who shows up all the time to games and is a decent player but he’s a spotlight guy. When the spotlight is on him he’s engaged and doing his thing but when it’s not he’s just sort of sitting back and waiting for his time to come around again. There’s nothing wrong with this but I always think of games as ensemble casts. Sometimes the ensemble is helping build the scene together, sharing ideas, and including people in them. Recognize those moments. Push to be inclusive and not a solo act. It will allow you to act more often and engage the other people at the table.
  • The GM should not be the sole creator of content for your games. Depending on the game you can suggest things you’d like to see in the game. This can be through character conversation and action, asking the GM, or you can just declare it if the game give the players that much narrative control. Some GM’s will chafe at this style because they aren’t good at improvising but those GM’s will hopefully realize this actually makes their lives easier. It means they don’t always need to come up with the plot or the story. The players can take some of that responsibility for starting these arcs and it’s on the GM’s to help the players resolve them for good or ill.
  • Don’t be afraid to give the GM idea’s, especially if they would cause you more trouble. RPG’s are about telling stories which is a kind of fun. Stories are about drama and drama is created through conflict. Since trouble is just a kind of conflict that means trouble equals more fun. So giving your GM idea’s to cause you more trouble is actually giving your GM ideas so you can have more fun. Can you ken it.

That’s all I got this week folks. Let me know what you’re thinking and if you have other ideas to bring more fun to the group from the players seat.

Chris “The Light” Sniezak

2 comments

  1. Garrett

    Very good article. I remember when you played in my Star Wars game ages ago. You challenged me on some wild things you wanted to try and subtlely reminded me a GM should never say no but find how to make it work. Hence your jetpack antics. From that lesson I grew considerably with my GMing.
    Last few weeks in my Star Wars Dawn of Defiance game I let a player take the reigns for a sidequest. I got to play as a canon PC for the duration… a young Platt O’Keefe. It was a hoot playing a 14 year old girl who ditched her well-to-do family and took off leading a life of gambling and scoundrelish activities. Tony, who took over those sessions, commented afterwards how I pushed the envelope of things to try… and how I created specific relations with the other PCs based on background and how they acted in our first interactions. A good player will not just figure out the best strategy but find in-character plans and reactions that make the GM go, “Crap, that’s incredible. What happens next?”
    Garrett

  2. BlackHat_Matt

    All really good advice, especially about bringing energy to the table. I get players who show up sad, depressed or tired, and that’s my cue to give them coffee, a sympathetic ear or a good meal (I love cooking for my players), because if they’re not in the right headspace, they aren’t getting what they could out of the game.

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